who killed the radio star?

November 12, 2009 at 1:00 am Leave a comment

So, Radio, Radio
Tell me what i wanna know, wanna know
I’ve been wide awake, staying up all night
Waiting for a song that will make me feel alright.

According to a Nielsen analysis of a media study conducted by the Council for Research Excellence, 77% of adults are reached by broadcast radio on a daily basis, second only to television at 95%. The study found that Web/Internet (excluding email) reached 64%, newspaper 35%, and magazines 27%.

And, in a deeper analysis of audio media titled “How U.S. Adults Use Radio and Other Forms of Audio,” Nielsen found that:

  • 90% of consumers listen to some form of audio media per day
  • The 77% who listen to broadcast radio surpass the 37% who listen to CDs and tapes and the 12% who listen to portable audio devices.
  • Almost 80% of those aged 18 to 34 listening to broadcast radio in an average day.

In an earlier post, technology creates media businesses, I made the point that new technologies create new businesses. And they do. It does not mean that they always create them at the expense of other businesses. Although they eventually do. What it does mean, is that the money within an industry gets redistributed. And that is the current problem with media.

The iPod has not seemingly killed radio, but it has impact even in this demographic. As I have intimated in generational differences and graphed in technology creates media businesses there are probably more significant changes yet to occur. These differences cannot be measured (or readily considered) by surveys, such as those that introduced this blog.

We are seeing less money per listener in radio. Just as we are seeing less money per subscriber in newspapers. These were early forms of mass media. Is this because the nature of society is changing? That the mediums are becoming more efficient? That new forms of media are competing for the same dollar? Or, all of the above?

I say it is all of the above. Media is evolving. The problem is that we don’t know the end-state. If we did, we’d know what business model to develop. Until we do, enjoy the book and stop trying to flip to the last page. There is no last page. Never has been in media, and likely never will be.

Tell me it isn’t so… I’m listening.

Entry filed under: Media. Tags: , , , , .

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